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Category: Leaf weaving draft

Jump to navigation. Cyber Fiber classes are online weaving classes fully accessible on Weavolution. Enroll in a Cyber Fiber class today! Check our calendar for fiber events or weaving workshops near you, or perhaps to visit while on holiday! Browse many weaving books that have been published, bookmark the ones you own, or click on the links to buy where possible.

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All discussions will occur in groups, which can be very specific or general in nature. Groups you have joined here. You can share yarn, projects, and drafts with your groups. Join in the ongiong discussions. Your projects all in one place. Look back at your fantastic weaving projects, add new notes and reference the notes you already made.

leaf weaving draft

This will show all your drafts. This includes drafts you have created and those who have bookmarked. Your fiber stash all in one place. Look back at your fantastic fiber, add new notes and reference the notes you already made. Inspiration Projects The projects section is a collection of all woven things shared on Weavolution. Drafts Browse drafts shared by other users!

Looms Browse the variety of looms available and add the looms you own to your virtual studio. Yarns Browse the yarns listed on Weavolution and add what you own to your virtual stash!

Fiber Events - Weaving Workshops Check our calendar for fiber events or weaving workshops near you, or perhaps to visit while on holiday! Resources See the many resources available to help you with calculations for your projects, etc. Library Browse many weaving books that have been published, bookmark the ones you own, or click on the links to buy where possible. Community Groups Groups are a place for discussion.Cooks have recipes, builders have blueprints, and handweavers have weaving drafts.

There are a few different formats, but all drafts carry the same essential information. There is the tie-up box, the threading pattern, and the treadling sequence. The two formats I see most often are the typical American draft e. Many American drafts assume jack looms; whereas, Swedish drafts usually assume counterbalance or countermarch looms. However, any loom can weave from any draft.

Discover from the tie-up which shafts must be up and which down for each shedand do to the loom whatever is required to get them there. The threading pattern and treadling sequence begin at that point, and go out from there. The Swedish draft makes perfect sense remember, of course, I weave on Swedish countermarch looms. I picture the draft as if it is lying flat in front of me. Swedish draftwith a weft drawdown.

American draft, with a warp drawdown. Draft is hanging at the corner of the loom. The fabric logically grows in the same direction as the sequence of weft picks as seen on the treadling draft. Resources Getzmann, Ulla, and Becky Ashenden.

Weave Structures the Swedish Way.

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Hoogt, Madelyn Van der. The Complete Book of Drafting for Handweavers. Hi Karen, Thank you for this comparison of the two ways to write drafts, this will make translation much easier. One question. Do you mean this to apply to the American way of writing the draft? The American way of writing the draft usually has numerals for the rising shafts. For a jack loom, use the squares with numerals to tie up rising shafts.

The white squares, in this case, are used to tie up sinking shafts. Thanks Karen, a good blog to explain the differences quite clearly. Thank you again.A feature of the new shopping cart are improvements for the home page and the ability to show more images in the ads.

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I also like to print and do illustration work, and likely you will begin to see a greater diversity in my product line. Hopefully, you will see something that catches your eye and think; Here is a way to support this artist.

leaf weaving draft

I love to teach and love working with people in general. I excel at small groups and one on one, solving problems as we weave together. I love to research and curate information about weaving especially in the s to early s. I want to be part of the solution to identify and keep handweaving history and technical information in the accessible in public domain as much as possible.

But, at the same time software is not free, and web servers cost money to run. Keeping something alive will require a business model that generates supportable income in to the future after I am gone.

leaf weaving draft

I love to solve problems, and then I move on to the next problem. With COVID I lost my opportunity to demonstrate handweaving to the public by letting the new weavers try the looms for themselves, and have retreated into my studio.

While being in the studio, I decided that I could once again concentrate on historic research and drafting of contemporary versions of old patterns. I discovered that many of the designs I had created earlier in my career were no longer accessible because of the software going out of production, or becoming so expensive you needed to be a production weaver to be able to afford it.

I have been dedicating my free time to capturing what data I could from these drafts and I will be transferring them into a more usable format for future generations to enjoy. As I complete the task I will post them to the website. I can not list them for free, because I need to cover sample production and web hosting hosting costs. I design for all three types of looms.

In the shop I have decided to mark the number of shafts needed for a draft at the top of the description so as not to disappoint a weaver. You will know what you purchasing before you hit the download button. I also also elected to include weaving software files and manual draft files in the same draft archive packages so that people no longer have to choose one or the other.

A few more words about the work I believe I can deliver to the public. I like to design drafts and weave it before I post it to ensure accuracy, but at this point some days I do more designing than weaving.

I think I would like to work out a system with a fellow weaver sI would like to see I if can afford to pay a weaver to weave samples of these designs that I can post on the website and give credit for the work that was done. I have no worries if you determine that you would like to weave the design for production and sell items.A lot of new weavers find it tricky to read the weaving drafts.

These drafts have been transferring the information about the weave pattern, type of loom, threading, tie-up plan, lifting plan etc from one generation to the other. Broadly, there are two ways in which weaving patterns are drafted on paper- Tie-up Format Lift up plan. What is the difference? There is one straightforward difference between the two formats — Tie-up format is prepared if you are working on a floor loom having multiple treadles; upon pressing those treadles, the harness is either lifted up or sinks down depending on the type of loom rising shed and sinking shed loom.

Lift plan drafts are mainly associated with dobby looms and table looms. A dobby can be mechanical or electronic, but each harness can be selected without using treadles.

In a manual dobby loom, the pegs select the harness to be moved. Whereas in computer-assisted dobby loom a computer program selects which harness is to be moved. In either case, the harnesses are lifted or sunk by either leg power on a dobby pedal or other power sources.

Because no treadles are involved, a lift plan draft is also a good format for table loom weavers. The dobby and table loom weavers do have an advantage here because every tie-up draft can be rewritten as a lift plan draft, but not the other way around! Representation of the tie-up format. The figure above is a standard format of tie-up. In this presentation, the weaving draft consists of four essential elements which are as follows.

Horizontal Matrix: Represents threading of the loom. It tells you how you need to thread your warp for a specific pattern. The number of rows denote number of shafts or harness. The threading is usually read from right to left. Vertical Matrix: In case of a floor loom, treadling is written vertically and each column corresponds to one treadle.

The treadles are numbered from left to right. This matrix shows the sequence in which treadles are to be pressed to get the desired pattern. Junction Matrix: This junction at the top right corner shows how the harness on which threading is done and the treadles are linked via lams.

Draw Down Area: A schematic representation of the cloth itself. Representation of the lifting plan format. Every row in the lift plan corresponds to one weft pick, while the columns correspond directly to the shaft which gets lifted. Note that the treadling section no longer represents the treadles that have to be pressed — they now show which shafts have to be raised on each row.

Related Post: Warp and weft meaning in woven fabric References. Tags Fabric Textiles Weaving. Facebook Twitter. Her interests include sustainable fashion, functional garments and luxury brand management. You might like Show more.

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Tabify by Templateify v1.A weave draft is divided into four quadrants—each one a different size. See Figure A. The bold lines are the skeleton of all drafts and divide the whole draft into separate parts. Figure B shows the quadrants of a weave draft and a description of what each quadrant represents.

To interpret the drafts, read outwards from the bold lines in the directions the arrows show Figure C. In other words, in the upper left section, read the draft from right-to-left. Read from left-to-right in the upper right section, and so on. It can be confusing, sometimes starting from the right and sometimes starting from the left.

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The key is to see that everything works outward from the bold lines. Each part of a weave draft can be called a draft. That is, a threading draft, a tie-up draft, a treadling draft, and a drawdown draft complete a weave draft. The threading draft shows how the strands are to be threaded in the heddles on the shafts.

Once the threads have been put into the heddles, they will not normally ever be changed for the entire warp. The tie-up draft and the treadling draft tell which shafts are to be lifted and when.

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They can be changed anytime along the way. The drawdown area shows the results from the other parts of the draft.

Leaf weaving draft

It is from the extensive page chapter on Drafting with 77 illustrations in the Drafting Chapter alone! The chapter contains comprehensive discussions on analyzing fabric and multi-shaft weaving. Thanks so much. I know to read the draft from right to left. However, when I am standing at the back of the loom I thread right to left through heddles, right? If you are at the back and threading the heddles from right to left you should read the draft beginning at the left side of the draft and read the draft from left to right.

You want the draft to read right to left as you are looking at the heddles at the front of the loom. However, it may not make any difference if the draft is symmetrical.

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Then you can do whatever you like. Most of the boxes are marked with a slash except that there is a 3 in some. What does that mean? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Patty Linville Seward, Alaska. Do you understand that you need to use tabby?

If you read the tie-ups for shafts lifted, the pattern will be on the back side of your cloth. If you have questions, please let me know.Together they show how to thread the heddles, tie up the treadles, and weave the fabric row by row. The Threading Draft shows the order for threading the warp ends in the heddles. It is always written horizontally with one row for each shaft harness.

When the loom is threaded ready to weave and you are sitting at the loom holding the threading draft, the threading and the draft match. No matter how the loom got threaded, the left side of the draft matches the left side of the threaded heddles. Shaft 1 is closest to you and shaft 4 is farthest away. The usual way to read the draft is from right to left, starting from the tie-up corner, but it can be read in either direction.

The yarns are threaded one at a time through the shafts. The numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 in the threading draft merely refer to the shaft number and could be replaced by symbols or by letters indicating colors.

Repeats are shown by brackets. The draft above shows that 12 warp ends are to be repeated a total of five times before proceeding. The total number of warp ends shown here equal At the right corner of the draft, the intersection of the threading draft and the treadling sequence, the Tie-Up shows which shafts aligning with threading draft are tied to each treadle pedal. Each vertical colum of the tie-up and treadling sequence shows one treadle. The Os in the tie-up show that the shaft rises when the treadle is pressed.

Thus the first treadle on the left in the draft below lifts both shafts 1 and 2, the next treadle lifts shafts 2 and 3, and so on. Sometimes tie-ups show Xs rather than Os. Xs show that the shaft sinks when the trealde is pressed. One way to remember this is the bubbles O float and anchors X sink. To convert a tie-up with Xs to one with Os, add an O to each open square.

Together the Xs and Os fill all the squares of the tie-up.

leaf weaving draft

The Treadling Sequence is the block of vertical columns at the right side of the draft.Jump to navigation. Cyber Fiber classes are online weaving classes fully accessible on Weavolution. Enroll in a Cyber Fiber class today! Check our calendar for fiber events or weaving workshops near you, or perhaps to visit while on holiday! Browse many weaving books that have been published, bookmark the ones you own, or click on the links to buy where possible.

Groups are a place for discussion. All discussions will occur in groups, which can be very specific or general in nature. Groups you have joined here. You can share yarn, projects, and drafts with your groups.

Join in the ongiong discussions. Your projects all in one place. Look back at your fantastic weaving projects, add new notes and reference the notes you already made. This will show all your drafts. This includes drafts you have created and those who have bookmarked. Your fiber stash all in one place. Look back at your fantastic fiber, add new notes and reference the notes you already made. Finished a 3 panel bed spread in M's and O's weave structure. One panel did not match as well as the other 2, but on the bed it is not even noticeable.

The joins help in that to. I think it is the best bedspread I have ever woven even if the panels are not perfectly matched. Of course the goal is to match them as well as possible. But as far as design, texture and feel of the cloth, it's a winner. I like this structure a lot, and so simple. It's huge on my little twin sized bed. Included here is a photo of my threading key I developed that I use for 4 blocks of M's and O's on 8 shafts. There is a true plain weave selvedge.

This is an old familiar overshot motif known as 'Blooming Leaf', others may call it 'Star of Bethlehem'. Love the historic look of blooming leaf. Your 3 panel is elegant and simply lovely.

I'm encouraged to hear you say you're happy even though the match- up isn't exact on one seam, and that it's not noticeable. Yes 12 yards, 36" wide. I didn't need the last yard, but never know about take-up loss when weaving. The threading key there is color effect or shadow weave, this is to show the design well in weaving software.

But, the warp and the weft color was one color each. Otherwise when you zoom out to see the whole design it washes out the pattern on the screen. Inspiration Projects The projects section is a collection of all woven things shared on Weavolution.

Drafts Browse drafts shared by other users!


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